What is IB? Why IB

ONE MISSION – TO CREATE A BETTER AND PEACEFUL WORLD

CHALLENGING PROGRAMMES PROVIDING A CONTINUUM OF EDUCATION
FOR CHILDREN FROM 3-19 YEARS
OVER 4,200 IB WORLD SCHOOLS IMPLEMENTING MORE THAN 5,300 PROGRAMMES
MORE THAN 75,000 TEACHERS TRAINED EACH YEAR
MORE THAN 1,250,000 STUDENTS AGED 3 TO 19
EDUCATION FOCUSED ON BUILDING CHARACTER

What Makes IB Programmes Unique:

Research-based

IB programmes and curriculums are designed after a lot of thoughtful and detailed research. The programmes go under regular reviews and curriculum is modified to give the best possible education to IB students which will help them cope with the requirements of fast changing world. Innovative and creative educators from many different cultures play a critical role in the development of each programme. The programmes represent the best practices from around the world. IB is flexible and responds to latest research in teaching and learning and takes help of experts from various filed.

Independent

The IB and its programmes are unique in many ways, it is a not-for-profit organization, whatever income it gets is reinvested in research and development. IB is independent of political and commercial interests. It operates in 150 countries and works with the national boards of many nations. It’s curriculum is flexible and a school can incorporate its national and regional curriculum within the IB curriculum framework.

International

IB is committed to international education and believes that you can only appreciate other cultures if you are confident about your own culture first. The IB curriculum makes students truly international by training students in two languages, making them explore global issues and by making them learn about the history of their own region and local environment. Students are encouraged to see the entire world as their responsibility but at the same time are guided to discover their roots.

Widely recognized

IB programmes are challenging and are recognized by Universities and future employers for their depth and breadth. Universities and future employers appreciate the rigorous work undertaken by IB students. In spite of this breadth, the depth of subject study is not sacrificed. Universities also welcome the creativity, activity and service (CAS) requirement, alongside the 4,000 word extended essay component in the DP that demands research, analysis and in-depth study to prepare students for work at university level. Research by and with universities in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States has demonstrated that IB students are well prepared for university. Almost 2,000 of the best universities around the world list their IB admission policies on IB web site at http:// www.ibo.org. The IB is proud of results its students have achieved year after year, but for students the IB experience is much more than that: it’s not just a way to learn, it’s a way of life.

Students learn how to learn

IB students develop approaches to learning skills and the attributes of the IB learner profile. Students take responsibility for their own learning and understand how knowledge itself is constructed through the unique theory of knowledge (TOK) course. They learn how to learn and are encouraged to try different approaches to their learning and to take responsibility for their own educational progress.

IB Students

  • ask challenging questions
  • think critically
  • develop research skills proven to help them in higher education.

IB programmes also encourage students to be active in their communities and to take their learning beyond academic study. They develop a sense of responsibility and are encouraged to take action through CAS and service learning.

University Readiness

IB DP is a strong preparation for University readiness. The IB Programmes are holistic and provide academic and nonacademic knowledge, skills and abilities absolutely necessary for success in college and university. Many research studies show how well prepared and confident students feel undergoing higher studies after IB education. IB programmes build the research, communication and critical thinking skills necessary for college success.

In 1968, the IB Diploma Programme (DP) was established to provide a challenging and comprehensive education that would enable students to understand and manage the complexities of our world and provide them with skills and attitudes for taking responsible action for the future. Such an education was rooted in the belief that people who are equipped to make a more just and peaceful world need an education that crosses disciplinary, cultural, national and geographical boundaries

An IB education is unique because of its rigorous academic and personal standards. IB programmes challenge students to excel not only in their studies but also in their personal growth. The IB aims to inspire a lifelong quest for learning hallmarked by enthusiasm and empathy. To that end, the IB gathers a worldwide community of supporters who celebrate our common humanity and who share a belief that education can help to build a better world.

At the centre of an International Baccalaureate (IB) education are students aged 3 to 19 with unique learning styles, strengths and challenges. The IB focuses on each student as a whole person. Thus, IB programmes address not only cognitive development but social, emotional and physical well-being. The aim is to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people with adaptable skills to tackle society’s complex challenges and who will help to make it a better, more peaceful world.

Validating the efficacy of the IB’s programmes are research and more than 45 years of practical experience. IB programmes emphasize learning how to learn and teaching students to value learning as an essential, integral part of their everyday lives. The IB promotes the development of schools that:

  • inspire students to ask questions, pursue personal aspirations, set challenging goals and develop the persistence to achieve those goals
  • develop knowledgeable students who make reasoned ethical judgments and acquire the flexibility, perseverance and confidence they need in order to bring about meaningful change
  • encourage healthy relationships, individual and shared responsibility and effective teamwork.

IB World School students develop strong academic, social and emotional characteristics. They are also likely to perform well academically – often better than students of other programmes. For example, research has shown that students with the IB Diploma Programme (DP) are likely to enroll at top universities, and students on the Primary Years Programme (PYP) and Middle Years Programme (MYP) outperform other students in a number of areas.